Eastern Coast Hedgehog Show 2019 (Or, Charlie Appreciation Post)

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There is no better time to be a hedgehog enthusiast than early May. Why, you may ask? Because that is when the annual HedgieCon is held. HedgieCon is the annual gathering of hedgehog breeders, rescuers, owners, and lover. Every other year it switches coasts with 2019 being the East Coast Hedgehog Show, 2020 will see it on the West Coast again. I’ve yet to attend a West Coast show, but maybe next year I will? I hear it’s an even bigger show than the Eastern one, given how Colorado has the first hedgehog rescuer still residing there, and some of the bigger breeders.

While HedgieCon is considered a Hedgehog Show, and does indeed allow you a chance to show your hedgehog to see how it measures up to the Standard it is far more than one might expect. The actual competition is friendly, and full of laughter. Unlike dogs hedgehogs can’t exactly be trained to sit still for the judging – all too often a hedgehog will huff and puff or run in an attempt to meet the others around it. At our second show our hedgehog Starlord actually tried to crawl into the Judge’s hands. Such is the nature of a hedgehog show.

This year there was Bingo for various silly prizes, craftmaking, hats for the hedgehogs to wear, a poster contest, silent auctions, and of course the classic Hedgehog Olympic Games and Hedgehog Bowling. The last two involve:

Hedgehogs in a playpen with a variety of toys. Points are awarded for each interaction with the toys. The winner takes home a trophy full of mealworms.

and

Hedgehogs in hamster balls (hopefully) running into paper towel and toilet paper tubes individually marked. Points are awarded for how many are knocked down (and the markings upon them.) One year this included a hedgehog running out of the room and down the hall in his hamster ball.

As you can probably tell, HedgieCon is a blast. It’s a bit like a big party between friends, as many people return year after year. The show was in Richmond this year, and we were so happy to be able to visit a city we love with people we love once more.

I want to sincerely thank everyone who we saw there, and especially Kellie for allowing me to show Ginny in the show. While I’m sad she didn’t place, it was still a pleasure to get to know her.

Now, speaking of Kellie, I want to take the time to share the biggest highlight of HedgieCon with you all. At HedgieCon I met a wonderful hedgehog named Charlie. Charlie, while described as grumpy in the e-mail I quote below, was nothing but sweet to me and my husband. I adored the time I got to spend with him. Charlie is a prime example of why hedgehog rescuing matters, and the changes it can produce in an animal’s life.

I asked Katelynn to share Charlie’s story with us. So, please enjoy and admire this beautiful old man. I hope his story moves you as it did me.

 

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‘Hi Hilary, 

Here is a little bit of Charlie’s story and how he became the grump he is now. 
It all started about three years ago when Kellie found a post about a little hedgie in need of a home. Kellie contacted his previous owner and the mission to save him began.
Kellie and Jeff went to pick up this grumpy ball of quills. When they arrived, the lady met them on the back porch and you could immediately tell that there was a situation happening here. Not to go into too much graphic detail, I will say that it was a hoarding situation. There were so many cats that all you could smell from the outside, was litter boxes. 
They instantly took one year old Charlie. Once they got him home and gave him a bath, they knew something was wrong with him. They took him to the vet. After some tests, they quickly discovered that it was their worst fear come to life. Charlie was fighting for his life. 
Turns out Charlie had a terrible infection that made him lose all of the quills on his hind end. Kellie had to clean him by hand every single day for a month. In this process, she lost her thumb nail and his quills never grew back. 
Spring forward three years. Charlie is now an old man hedgehog that has fathered many beautiful litters of babies. All with the best temperament and coloring. 
Thank you for reading.
Katelynn’
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Choosing the Right Hedgehog

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Reminder: If you’re interested in meeting us and some of our hedgehogs tomorrow you can get the details on how to do so here. We’d love to meet you, and would be happy to answer questions in person and show off our hedgehog friends. 🙂

So, you’ve decided that a hedgehog is the right pet for you.  Now how do you go about getting one?

Avoid Pet Stores

Some big pet stores, especially here in the DC Metro Area, have begun carrying hedgehogs in the small animal sections of their stores.  Most exotic pet shops carry them.  While it may be tempting to just purchase one there that not a good idea when it comes to hedgehogs. While some shops may be wonderful, the vast majority of them are ill equipped to house hedgehogs and the employees not terribly knowledgeable when it comes to how to care for them.  They’re an unusual pet, and uncommon enough that even the most widespread book on hedgehog care is 15 years out of date and riddled with inaccuracies.

This leaves us with the smart option: a breeder.

Find a Good Breeder

Like pet shops, not all breeders are alike. You need to find the one that is right for you. People breed hedgehogs for different reasons, but any good breeder will primarily breed for health and temperament, everything else coming after those two vital points. Decide if you are after a show hedgehog, want specific markings or traits, and what personality you might be searching for.

A good breeder will provide a warranty against things like Wobbly Hedgehog Syndrom (WHS), will take the hedgehog back if for some reason you’re not satisfied, and will be willing to help you if you have questions along the way. Avoid breeders who aren’t willing to discuss the parents of your hoglet, are willing to give the hoglets up before the 6 week weaning, or are reticent in answering questions about the hoglets upbringing.

A good breeder will want to help you, and will be eager to help you choose the hoglet right for you.

Meet the Hedgehogs

Before choosing a hedgehog it’s important to meet them.  Ask about the hoglets personality before you purchase it, and make certain to handle it prior to, or at, the pick up.  The hoglet should be active and curious.  Ensure that the baby does more than just curl into a ball and spike up when being handled, and reconsider your decision if the hedgehog begins to hiss, pop, or make a harsh barking/clicking sound.  An unwillingness to unroll and these aggressive displays are markers you do not want to encounter in your new pet.

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This turned into self-anointing.

The hoglet may nibble and lick, but none of these should be outright bites.Self-anointing is something that you very much want to see in a new pet, as it’s a sign of happiness and trust. You want to be able to pet the hedgehog and to let it explore you. If you are more wanting a cuddly hedgehog, you should be quite happy if it falls asleep on you.  Listen for purrs, but don’t be surprised if you don’t get them this soon.

Know What to Look For

A good guide for what you want to look for would be the Hedgehog Standard used in hedgehog shows. While obviously your new pet doesn’t need to be show quality, the standard is still a very good indicator of health in hedgehogs and what all breeders should strive for. It is worth familiarizing yourself with what the ideal hedgehog would look like so you can avoid any unforeseen troubles with your new pet.

To summarize the Standard, your new hedgehog should appear as follows:

Your hedgehog’s face should be wide with the muzzle line being straight and short. Its eyes should be wide apart and bright and alert. The ears should be large and spaced well apart and velvety to the touch. They shouldn’t appear crusty or ragged.

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Bright and alert!

Head shape

Big ears, short muzzle, wide face with good lines.

The hedgehogs body should be an oval shape with the rump being a gentle curve. From the side the hedgehog’s body should also present a nicely curved line. The hedgehog should be able to curl into a ball and hide its face, an inability to curl completely is a sign of obesity which is a large health risk to the hedgehog.

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Ovals!

Front feet should have five toes, and back feet should have four. The legs should be long and elegant, not noticeably bowed or hockeyed. All legs should be functioning. At a very young age hedgehogs are liable to damaging their toes and/or losing them. If your hedgehog has incurred this injury the breeder should tell you before you pick the hedgehog up. It doesn’t ruin their mobility, and isn’t life threatening – but it is something a good breeder would inform you of.

The quills should be full and evenly spaced over the body. You shouldn’t be able to see any sparse patches, or any real breaks in the dispersion. The quills should be straight and strong and have the feel of a bristle brush when you run your hand over them. You shouldn’t see any twisted or curly quills, and no ingrown quills.

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I hope this helps you find a good hedgehog!